Patience is a virtue.

As a teacher of a particular physical fitness regime such as Pilates, I see many people come into it with a mindset that Pilates will be the “quick fix.” I have wonder what it is that gives someone this impression? We don't need to look to far! We live a society where quick, easy and minimal effort seems like the norm. 

Take social media for example. It presents us with this idea that to “look good” at something, one needs only a kick-butt social media campaign, savvy filter apps, and some cute slogan. Suddenly that person is at the top of the chart, looking like it. And that image that society is given is what I believe drives people to come to me and say they want to look like this, be like this, have a body like this. However, after ten sessions with pilates, a person will usually see that perhaps the learning of Pilates is going to take a bit more time. 

It takes a long time to change our body.  Let’s face it! Some of us want to change a body of 40 plus years. Well, news flash! We didn’t develop a sore back, a weakened core, and our body imbalances overnight! We don’t usually hire a trainer, seek out the physiotherapist, and visit the doctor’s office when we are on a body-winning streak. We have problems! And it’s going to take some time, probably a lot of time, to work through these problems. 

I believe the practice of Pilates will bring change and balance back into the body in time, but it does require both patience and time for that to happen. So the next time we want to be instantly good at something, we might want to consider how long it took us to get really bad or in need of a tune up in the first place. 

With practice and patience comes change. There are no quick “instant fixes’ for our bodies; otherwise, why would we even be given a body and mind to learn how to change. We’d be perfect, and I’d be out of a job. 

- Keep moving

Carmen Lanteigne.

   My first teacher training program circa 2003  

My first teacher training program circa 2003